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Volcanic activity is the most powerful force in nature. Some volcanic eruptions are much more powerful than the largest nuclear explosion. Volcanoes have killed thousands of people and caused some of the most frightening events in human history.

This site includes information about volcanoes, their activity, and how they form and erupt.

GVP Eruption Reports

GVP Eruption Reports

GVP Eruption Reports Feed

Karangetang (Indonesia) - Report for 5 January-11 January 2022 - NEW

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Jan 12, 2022

PVMBG reported that incandescence from Karangetang?s N crater was periodically visible during 5-10 January. Daily white emissions rose generally 150 m above the summit, but sometimes as high as 200 m. During 9-10 January white-and-gray plumes rose as high as 200 m. The Alert Level remained at 2 (on a scale of 1-4).

Source: Pusat Vulkanologi dan Mitigasi Bencana Geologi (PVMBG, also known as CVGHM)

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Krysuvik-Trolladyngja (Iceland) - Report for 5 January-11 January 2022 - NEW

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Jan 12, 2022

Icelandic Meteorological Office (IMO) reported that the earthquake swarm at the Krsuvk-Trlladyngja volcanic system that began on 21 December 2021 had ceased. Additionally, InSAR and GPS data last recorded deformation on 28 December. IMO lowered the Aviation Color Code to Yellow on 7 January.

Source: Icelandic Meteorological Office (IMO)

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Piton de la Fournaise (France) - Report for 5 January-11 January 2022 - NEW

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Jan 12, 2022

OVPF reported that the eruption at Piton de la Fournaise continued during 5-11 January 2022. Weather clouds often obscured views of the vent, though visual observations were made daily. Lava fountains sometimes rose above the crater rim. The level of the lava lake periodically rose and overflowed the cone, sending lava flows down the flanks during 6 and 8-9 January. The lava effusion rate was an estimated 2-20 meters per second based on satellite data. Several breakouts of lava from the tube were noted. On 9 January a new lava flow slowly advanced along the S margin of the flow field, reaching 1,800 m elevation. On 10 January hikers observed smoke from an area in the S part of the caldera, likely from vegetation that had been set on fire from lava flows. The flow field continued to widen but had not significantly lengthened.

Source: Observatoire Volcanologique du Piton de la Fournaise (OVPF)

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Semeru (Indonesia) - Report for 5 January-11 January 2022 - NEW

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Jan 12, 2022

PVMBG reported that the eruption at Semeru continued during 5-11 January. Crater incandescence was visible each night. Gray-and-white plumes rose 300-600 m during 4-8 and 10 January. Pyroclastic flows descended the Kobokan (SE) and Lengkong drainages during 5-6 January and avalanches traveled 700 m down the Kobokan drainage during 6-7 January. At 2311 on 7 January a pyroclastic flow traveled 3 km down the Kobokan drainage, and another traveled 1 km down the same drainage during 8-9 January. The Alert Level remained at 3 (on a scale of 1-4). Due to lahar, avalanche, and pyroclastic flow hazards, the public was warned to stay at least 500 m away from the Kobokan drainage within 17 km of the summit, and other drainages originating on Semeru including the Bang, Kembar, and Sat.

Source: Pusat Vulkanologi dan Mitigasi Bencana Geologi (PVMBG, also known as CVGHM)

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Wolf (Ecuador) - Report for 5 January-11 January 2022 - NEW

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Jan 12, 2022

IG reported that a seismic swarm at Wolf began at 2100 on 6 January, followed by a M 2.4 earthquake recorded at 2135, and tremor at 2315. Fissures opened in an area SE of the summit caldera within five minutes of the onset of tremor and a new eruption began. At 0020 on 7 January satellite images showed ash-and-gas plumes rising to varying altitudes between 1.9 km (6,200 ft) and 3.8 km (12,500 ft) a.s.l., with the lower parts of the plume drifting NE and the higher parts drifting W. Thermal anomalies indicated advancing lava flows down the S and SE flanks. The Parque Nacional Galpagos and the Galapagos Conservancy evacuated eight people by helicopter, including park rangers and scientists that were working near the rim, as a precaution and noted that habitat for a population of critically endangered Pink Land Iguana was far from the eruption. Photos showed a line of lava fountains rising along the fissure and lava flows advancing over vegetation. Thermal anomalies continued to indicate advancing lava during 8-11 January. Plumes mostly consisting of gas rose as high as 1.3 km (4,300 ft) a.s.l. and drifted W and SW. The lava flows were not far from the ocean by 10 January. Photos posted on 11 January by Parque Nacional Galpagos showed lava fountaining at a growing cone and fluid lava flows advancing from the base of the cone. The lava flows had traveled 15 km SE, then E, by 11 January.

Sources: Galapagos Conservancy,Instituto Geofsico-Escuela Politcnica Nacional (IG) ,Parque Nacional Galpagos

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Aira (Japan) - Report for 5 January-11 January 2022

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Jan 12, 2022

JMA reported that incandescence from Minamidake Crater (at Aira Caldera?s Sakurajima volcano) was visible at night during 3-10 January. An eruptive event at 0143 on 7 January produced an ash plume that rose 1.3 km and ejected bombs 600-900 m away from the crater. The Alert Level remained at 3 (on a 5-level scale), and residents were warned to stay 2 km away from the crater.

Source: Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA)

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Great Sitkin (United States) - Report for 5 January-11 January 2022

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Jan 12, 2022

AVO reported that slow lava effusion at Great Sitkin probably continued during 5-11 January, though cloudy conditions prevented satellite and webcam confirmation. Seismicity was very low; several small seismic events were recorded during 9-10 January. The Aviation Color Code and the Volcano Alert Level remained at Orange and Watch, respectively.

Source: US Geological Survey Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO)

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Grimsvotn (Iceland) - Report for 5 January-11 January 2022

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Jan 12, 2022

The Icelandic Meteorological Office (IMO) lowered the Aviation Color Code for Grmsvtn to Green on 12 January, noting that seismicity had returned to normal levels with a few earthquakes detected over the previous few weeks. The caldera had deepened during the jkulhlaup (glacial outburst flood) that had occurred during November and December 2021, though IMO noted that it was difficult to characterize the current status of the caldera and the level of the geothermal activity.

Source: Icelandic Meteorological Office (IMO)

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Karymsky (Russia) - Report for 5 January-11 January 2022

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Jan 12, 2022

KVERT reported that a thermal anomaly over Karymsky was visible in satellite images during 2-3 January. The Aviation Color Code remained at Orange (the second highest level on a four-color scale). Dates are based on UTC times; specific events are in local time where noted.

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)

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Kilauea (United States) - Report for 5 January-11 January 2022

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Jan 12, 2022

HVO reported that lava effusion resumed at the vent in the lower W wall of Kilauea?s Halema`uma`u Crater at around 0400 on 5 January, ending a 3-day pause. The sulfur dioxide emission rate was about 3,300 tonnes per day on 6 January. Lava effused from the vent on most days during 6-11 January, though effusion paused and the lake crusted over for most of the day on 7 January. Several overflows onto older crust were observed after effusion resumed at around 2130 on 7 January through 8 January. The W surface of the lava lake was active during 9-10 January, though there were some more pauses in lava effusion from the W vent during 10-11 January. The Aviation Color Code and the Volcano Alert Level remained at Orange and Watch, respectively.

Source: US Geological Survey Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO)

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