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Volcanic activity is the most powerful force in nature. Some volcanic eruptions are much more powerful than the largest nuclear explosion. Volcanoes have killed thousands of people and caused some of the most frightening events in human history.

This site includes information about volcanoes, their activity, and how they form and erupt.

GVP Eruption Reports

GVP Eruption Reports

GVP Eruption Reports Feed

Asosan (Japan) - Report for 17 November-23 November 2021 - NEW

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Nov 23, 2021

JMA lowered the Alert Level for Asosan to 2 (on a scale of 1-5) at 1100 on 18 November and decreased the restricted area to a radius of 1 km, noting that no eruptions had been recorded since the 21 October eruption. The sulfur dioxide emission rate remained elevated in November and was 2,100 tons per day on 16 November. The amplitudes of volcanic microtremors fluctuated for a period after the eruption, though they were generally small beginning on 1 November.

Source: Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA)

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Karymsky (Russia) - Report for 17 November-23 November 2021 - NEW

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Nov 23, 2021

KVERT reported that during 11-13 and 18 November explosions at Karymsky generated ash plumes that rose as high as 8 km (26,200 ft) a.s.l. and drifted 400 km NE and NW. A thermal anomaly was visible in satellite images during 14-18 November. The Aviation Color Code remained at Orange (the second highest level on a four-color scale).

Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)

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Turrialba (Costa Rica) - Report for 17 November-23 November 2021 - NEW

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Nov 23, 2021

OVSICORI-UNA reported that at 0624 on 23 November a one-minute-long eruption at Turrialba produced a plume that rose 500 m above the crater rim and drifted SW. Another small eruption was recorded on 7 November.

Source: Observatorio Vulcanologico y Sismologico de Costa Rica-Universidad Nacional (OVSICORI-UNA)

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Aira (Japan) - Report for 17 November-23 November 2021

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Nov 23, 2021

JMA reported that incandescence from Minamidake Crater (at Aira Caldera?s Sakurajima volcano) was visible at night during 15-22 November. Three eruptive events were recorded during 15-19 November. The sulfur dioxide emission rate was 700 tons per day on 16 November. The Alert Level remained at 3 (on a 5-level scale), and residents were warned to stay 2 km away from the crater.

Source: Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA)

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Dukono (Indonesia) - Report for 17 November-23 November 2021

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Nov 23, 2021

Based on satellite and wind model data, the Darwin VAAC reported that on 17 November ash plumes from Dukono rose to 2.1 km (7,000 ft) a.s.l. and drifted NE and ENE. Dense white plumes rose as high as 500 m and drifted NW, W, and SW during 18-23 November according to PVMBG. The Alert Level remained at 2 (on a scale of 1-4), and the public was warned to remain outside of the 2-km exclusion zone.

Sources: Darwin Volcanic Ash Advisory Centre (VAAC),Pusat Vulkanologi dan Mitigasi Bencana Geologi (PVMBG, also known as CVGHM)

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Great Sitkin (United States) - Report for 17 November-23 November 2021

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Nov 23, 2021

AVO reported that lava effusion at Great Sitkin had slowed or paused based on a 17 November satellite image that showed no advancement of the lava flows since 10 November. Seismicity remained elevated during 17-23 November and elevated surface temperatures were visible in occasionally clear satellite images. Steam emissions were sometimes visible in webcam images. The Aviation Color Code and the Volcano Alert Level remained at Orange and Watch, respectively.

Source: US Geological Survey Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO)

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Katmai (United States) - Report for 17 November-23 November 2021

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Nov 23, 2021

AVO reported that during 17-18 November strong winds in the vicinity of Katmai and the Valley of Ten Thousand Smokes blew unconsolidated ash SE over Shelikof Strait and Kodiak Island at an altitude up to 2.1 km (7,000 ft) a.s.l. The ash was originally deposited during the Novarupta eruption in 1912. The Volcano Alert Level remained at Normal and the Aviation Color Code remained at Green.

Source: US Geological Survey Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO)

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Kilauea (United States) - Report for 17 November-23 November 2021

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Nov 23, 2021

HVO reported that the summit eruption at Kilauea continued at a vent in the lower W wall of Halema`uma`u Crater. By 16 November the total volume of erupted lava was an estimated 30 million cubic meters, and the lake which had risen a total of 60 m since 29 September. During 17-23 November earthquake activity remained below background levels but volcanic tremor was elevated. Spattering and ponded lava within the vent were visible; lava entered the lake through the E part of the W wall cone, feeding an active area of the lake. Lava periodically oozed from the cooler, outer margins of the lake onto the lowest of the exposed down-dropped caldera floor blocks. The sulfur dioxide emission rate remained above background levels, and was 3,000-3,800 tonnes per day on 18 and 23 November. The Aviation Color Code and the Volcano Alert Level remained at Orange and Watch, respectively.

Source: US Geological Survey Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO)

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Krysuvik-Trolladyngja (Iceland) - Report for 17 November-23 November 2021

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Nov 23, 2021

Icelandic Meteorological Office (IMO) reported that no eruptive activity at the Krsuvk-Trlladyngja volcanic system had been visible since 18 September. Small quantities of volcanic gases continued to be detected in the atmosphere. At the end of September, after the eruption had ceased, inflation of the Reykjanes Peninsula began to be detected and broadly correlated with an area that deflated during the eruption. The inflation was thought to be most likely caused by further intrusion of magma; the earthquake swarm detected S of Keilir in late September may be related to such an intrusion, though no deformation was detected at the surface during the swarm. IMO noted that such an influx of magma following an eruption was not uncommon, and that the inflation did not necessarily mean that another eruption was imminent.

Source: Icelandic Meteorological Office (IMO)

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La Palma (Spain) - Report for 17 November-23 November 2021

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Nov 23, 2021

The eruption at La Palma continued during 17-23 November, characterized by Strombolian explosions and lava fountaining/jetting from multiple vents, advancing and sometimes branching lava flows, and daily ash emissions. Eruption details are based on official sources including daily PEVOLCA (Plan de Emergencias Volcnicas de Canarias) steering committee summaries. Volcanic tremor levels increased during 16-17 November then returned to low levels. Seismicity persisted at variable but elevated levels, with earthquake locations distributed at depths of 10-15 km and 30-40 km. The number of located earthquakes peaked at 230 during 17-18 November, which was the highest daily total recorded since the beginning of the eruption. Additionally, a M 5.1 earthquake was detected at 0208 on 19 November at a depth of 36 km; this event was the largest earthquake recorded since the swarm heralding the magmatic intrusion began on 11 September. Dozens of events were felt by residents during the week. Several vents in the main cone continued to effuse lava, eject tephra, and emit ash-and-gas plumes at varying intensities. Lava was transported W through pre-existing lava channels and tubes or descended over older flows and over new ground, increasing the area of the flow field, which was made up of overlapping flows numbered 1-11. Flows 1, 2, and 9 had merged and contributed lava to the main delta, which had grown more than 0.43 square kilometers by 23 November. In the evening of 18 November lava overflowed one of the craters in the main cone and increased the lava-flow rate; crater overflows were again visible on 21 November. Lava filled in some gaps between the N flows, numbers 4 and 7. During 17-18 November flow 5 advanced along the N base of Montaa de Todoque and along the S edge of flow 4 which had also advanced and widened. By 21 November flow 4 had merged with flow 7, the branch to the N. Flow 7 advanced W and by 1303 on 22 November lava reached the sea at La Via Beach. Plumes ranging from white to dark gray rising from the new ocean entry prompted an air quality warning to be issued for about 3,000 people living in areas of San Borondn, Tazacorte, El Cardn, and Camino Los Palomares, all within about a 2 km radius to the N and NE. A ban on maritime activities near the entry also went into effect, though it was lifted the next morning. By 23 November the width of the flow field had grown to 3.3 km and lava covered an estimated 10.73 square kilometers. Sulfur dioxide emissions fluctuated at high levels between 900 and 32,000 tons per day, remaining at levels lower than the peak values of 50,000 tons per day recorded on 23 September. Suspended ash and high concentrations of volcanic gases triggered a few air-quality alerts mostly affecting the W part of the island; authorities warned residents of some affected areas (Los Llanos de Aridane, Tazacorte, El Paso, Puntagorda, and Tijarafe in particular) to stay indoors. High values of volcanic gases led to the evacuation of essential personnel working in plants in the exclusion zone during 16-17 November. After a lull in activity for a period of time on 17 November, Strombolian activity and ash emissions resumed later in the day and prompted a VONA the next day. Video posted at 1615 on 18 November showed jetting lava and billowing ash plumes containing some lightning flashes. Sometimes dense and billowing ash-and-gas plumes rose 2-3.7 km (6,600-12,100 ft) a.s.l. and drifted NE, E, ESE, and SW during the rest of the week. The 20 November PEVOLCA reported that the total volume of emitted tephra during the eruption had surpassed 10 million cubic meters. Ash deposits on runways and unfavorable flying conditions disrupted flights at La Palma airport during 21-23 November.

Sources: Aena,Gobierno de Canaries ,Instituto Geogrfico Nacional (IGN),Instituto Volcanolgico de Canarias (INVOLCAN)

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