Ungaran and Telomoyo, Java, Indonesia

Telomoyo, Java, Indonesia
Location:7.4S, 110.4E
Elevation: 6,214 feet (1,894 m)
Ungaran, Java, Indonesia
Location: 7.2S, 110.3E
Elevation: 6,726 feet (2,050 m)

Last Updated: October 05, 2005

NO ERUPTIVE HISTORY


Image of Telomoyo from the tourist town of Kopeng.
Image Credit: Desianto Fajar Wibisono

Telomoyo volcano, also spelled Telemojo, was constructed over the southern flank of the eroded Pleistocene Soropati volcano and is in part of Holocene age (van Bemmelen 1941). It lies along a NNW-SSE-trending line of volcanoes extending from Ungaran in the north to Merapi in the south. The eastern flank of Soropati volcano collapsed during the Pleistocene, leaving a U-shaped depression. Telomoyo subsequently filled much of the southern side of this depression and grew to a height of 600 m above its rim. Telomoyo has had no historic eruptions. (SI/USGS)


Landsat image of central Java.
Image is about 50 km across.
Image courtesy of the
Landsat Pathfinder Project.



Gunung Ungaran volcano, south of the northern coastal city of Semarang, lies at the northern end of a transverse chain of Java volcanoes extending NNW from Merapi. Ungaran was formed in three stages, with growth of the youngest edifice taking place during the late Pleistocene and Holocene. The youngest Ungaran edifice was constructed south of three large remnant structural blocks of the 2nd Ungaran volcano. A group of pyroclastic cones was also constructed along the margins of the older volcano. Ungaran is deeply eroded and no historical eruptions have been reported, but two active fumarole fields are located on the volcano's flanks. (SI/USGS)


The two small peaks at the left are part of the Telomoyo volcanic complex, which was constructed along a NNW-SSE-trending line of volcanoes extending from Ungaran in the north to Merapi in the south. Telomoyo filled much of the southern side of a depression formed by collapse of the Pleistocene Soropati volcano and grew to a height of 600 m above its rim. The two towering conical peaks in the background are Sumbing (L) and Sundoro (R); Slamet volcano is on the far right horizon.
Photo by Hideko and Minoru Kusakabe, 2000 (Okayama University).

These volcanoes are located north of Merbabu and Merapi.
Source of Information:

Simkin, T., and Siebert, L., 1994, Volcanoes of the World: Geoscience Press, Tucson, Arizona, 349 p.



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