OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY

Miyake-jima

Latitude (dd): 
34.08
Longitude (dd): 
139.53
Elevation (m): 
815
Country: 
Japan
State (Province, etc): 
Izu Islands
Type: 
Stratovolcano

 

Miyakejima Island viewed from east to west. Photo by Dr. Kayoko Suga, Metropolitan Tokyo Government, Japan.


January 13, 2004

As of 8 January, gas emissions continued at Miyake-jima. The sulfur-dioxide flux is sill relatively high with ~4,000-9,000 tons emitted per day. Residents of the island remained evacuated since September 2000.

 

 

This information was summarized from the GVP/USGS Weekly Volcanic Activity Report


August 12, 2003

High amounts of volcanic-gas emissions (especially sulfur dioxide) continued at Miyake-jima through mid-August. The eruption began in summer 2002 and no explosive activity has been reported in 2003.

This information was summarized from the GVP/USGS Weekly Volcanic Activity Report


April 22, 2003

The volcano has remained restless since its 2000 eruption, but no eruption has been reported thus far. Degassing occurred throughout the week and the SO2 gas output level remained high.

This information was summarized from the GVP/USGS Weekly Volcanic Activity Report


April 2, 2002

A minor eruption reaching 300 m above the volcano occurred on April 2nd.

This information was summarized from the GVP/USGS Weekly Volcanic Activity Report


24 May 2001

Steam plumes with abundant SO2 are continuously being emitted from the summit caldera to 0.5-2 km above the caldera rim. 33,000 to 26,000 tons of SO2 are being released per day. A steady, continuous deflation of the volcano is occurring. A M 2.8 earthquake occurred on 7 May.

This information was summarized from the GVP/USGS Weekly Volcanic Activity Report


21 March 2001

On 16 March, volcanic tremor was recorded at Miyake-jima. It was the strongest tremor recorded since August of 2000. Also on 19 March, a black ash cloud rose 800 m above the volcano. Currently, Miyake-jima has been uninhabited since September 2000 due to the volcanic activity that began in June of 2000.

This information was summarized from Smithsonian Institution's Preliminary Notices of Volcanic Activity.


31 August 2000

On 30 August, an earthquake and yet another eruption caused 775 residents to evacuate their homes for island shelters. The government also issued a warning that heavy rains could trigger mudslides on the island. A naval destroyer is standing by off the coast should a speedy evacuation be necessary. On 31 August, officials ordered the evacuation of the entire population of Miyakejima Island.

This information was summarized from Discovery Online


29 August 2000

On 28 August, Mount Oyama erupted twice. The first eruption occurred at 4:35 a.m. and covered the island in a cloud of smoke 5 miles high. The second eruption occurred at 2:53 p.m. Officials have ordered the evacuation of all school children from Miyake Island..

This information was summarized from Discovery Online.


22 August 2000

On 18 August, the Mount Oyama Volcano experienced its largest eruption in 17 years. Rocks and smoke shot 7,437 m into the air. The caldera is currently 1.4 km in diameter by 450 m deep. Large cinders fell in the southeastern part of the island. All previous eruptions have been phreatic in nature. The 18 August tephra is still being analyzed. Approximately 2,000 residents were evacuated. Meteorologists warn that heavy rains could trigger landslides of mud and ash.

This information was summarized from Smithsonian Institution's Preliminary Notices of Volcanic Activity and Discovery Online.


10 August 2000

On 10 August, the Oyama Volcano erupted forcing residents to evacuate. A 3,000 foot column of steam, smoke, and ash rose skyward. The Miyakejima Airport was closed as well as some of the island's roads due to falling ash and reduced visibility. Officials are urging residents living near the foot of the volcano to evacuate. The island chain has experienced tens of thousands of earthquakes in the past two months due to volcanic activity.

This information was summarized from Discovery Online and Smithsonian Institution's Preliminary Notices of Volcanic Activity.


14 July 2000

On 14 July, the Oyama Volcano erupted twice. The second eruption caused smoke to rise ~3,280 feet and was accompanied by loud explosions. An evacuation order has been issued due to the falling ash. During the past few weeks, 17,500 earthquakes have been recorded on the islands surrounding the Oyama Volcano. Miyakejima is one of a chain of seven islands south of Tokyo. The last major volcanic eruption at Oyama occurred in 1983. A lava flow in 1940 killed 11 people and it erupted again in 1962.

This information was summarized from Discovery Online and Smithsonian Institution's Preliminary Notices of Volcanic Activity.


29 June 29 2000

The possibility of an eruption at Mount Oyama is decreasing as the center of magma activity and earthquake epicenters continue to move west of Miyakejima Island. However, the Meteorological Agency said the danger of an eruption is not over. The agency stressed the need for a continued vigilant watch.

This information was summarized from Smithsonian Institution's Preliminary Notices of Volcanic Activity.

 


28 June 2000

On 28 June, at least 193 minor volcanic tremors were recorded on Miyakejima Island. The Meteorological Agency noted that the sea has changed color close to the west side of the island, and an area of the sea was bubbling. Volcanologists reported that underwater volcanic explosions probably had begun. Naval and Coast Guard ships are anchored offshore ready to evacuate the island's residents if necessary.

This information was summarized from Discovery Online

 


27 June 2000

Japan's Meteorological Agency is predicting an eruption of the Mount Oyama Volcano. Magma appears to be concentrated on the southwestern side of the 2,686 foot Mount Oyama. Rescue teams are evacuating residents of Miyakejima Island in preparation of an imminent eruption. 1,576 minor tremors were recorded in less than 24 hours. Mount Oyama last erupted in 1983 destroying homes in the city of Ako.

This information was summarized from Discovery Online